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5 Levelheaded Ways to Handle Disagreements With Your Cofounder

Via All Business : You and your partner were never meant to agree on everything. In fact, you may even disagree on most things. But handling your differences in a calm, collective manner is the only way to ensure the best outcome for your business.

That’s why we asked five entrepreneurs from FounderSociety the following question:

Q. What’s one best practice for solving disagreements/arguments with my cofounder or business partner?

1. Talk Face to Face

I seldom have disagreements with my cofounders. If we do, it’s typically a matter of us not looking at the problem the same way but desiring the same result. What works for me is stepping out of Slack and having a face-to-face conversation over coffee or a cocktail. —Ben Maitland-Lewis, Pretty Instant

2. Listen, Don’t Judge

Listen to what the person is saying at face value, then find the time to sit down and have a calm, reasoned conversation about the issue without any distractions. Ask open-ended questions and try to get to the bottom of things in a non-threatening way. Resolve that you will not leave the room until you have reached a decision you are both happy to accept. —Jessica Baker, Aligned Signs

3. Be Calm and Respectful

Solving a disagreement with a cofounder or business partner is fundamentally the same as solving a disagreement with anyone else. Remain calm, acknowledge what they have to say, and—perhaps most importantly—admit that you might be wrong. Remember that some arguments simply aren’t worth winning; there’s nothing saying you have to be the victor here, even if you are in the right. —Steven Buchwald, The E2 Visa Lawyer

4. Establish Clear Roles Beforehand

Disagreements come up between passionate partners. I’ve found that most issues are resolved quickly when my partners and I have clear roles and respect each other’s strengths. Defining roles and titles helps the entire organization understand who makes which calls. As leaders, we have to be accountable for our decisions. —Tony Banta, Live Mercury, Inc.

5. Opt for a Stress-Free Environment

Rather than trying to solve disagreements with brute force, it’s important for business owners to discuss conflicts in a less stressful environment, like over a meal or even over the weekend. —Ajmal Saleem, Suprex Learning

Source :

ALL BUSINESS | You and your partner were never meant to agree on everything. In fact, you may even disagree on most things. But handling your differences in a calm, collective manner is the only way to ensure the best outcome for your business. That’s why we asked five entrepreneurs from FounderSociety the following question: Q. What’s one best practice for solving disagreements/arguments with my cofounder or business partner? 1. Talk Face to Face I seldom have disagreements with my cofounders. If we do, it’s typically a matter of us not looking at the problem the same way but desiring the same result. What works for me is stepping out of Slack and having a face-to-face conversation over coffee or a cocktail. —Ben Maitland-Lewis, Pretty Instant 2. Listen, Don’t Judge Listen to what the person is saying at face value, then find the time to sit down and have a calm, reasoned conversation about the issue without any distractions. Ask open-ended questions and try to get to the bottom of things in a non-threatening way. Resolve that you will not leave the room until you have reached a decision you are both happy to accept. —Jessica Baker, Aligned Signs 3. Be Calm and Respectful Solving a disagreement with a cofounder or business partner is fundamentally the same as solving a disagreement with anyone else. Remain calm, acknowledge what they have to say, and—perhaps most importantly—admit that you might be wrong. Remember that some arguments simply aren’t worth winning; there’s nothing saying you have to be the victor here, even if you are in the right. —Steven Buchwald, The E2 Visa Lawyer 4. Establish Clear Roles Beforehand Disagreements come up between passionate partners. I’ve found that most issues are resolved quickly when my partners and I have clear roles and respect each other’s strengths. Defining roles and titles helps the entire organization understand who makes which calls. As leaders, we have to be accountable for our decisions. —Tony Banta, Live Mercury, Inc. 5. Opt for a Stress-Free Environment Rather than trying to solve disagreements with brute force, it’s important for business owners to discuss conflicts in a less stressful environment, like over a meal or even over the weekend. —Ajmal Saleem, Suprex Learning

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